PLNU News

28
Apr

Luke Harmon, a 2010 business administration graduate from PLNU, was named the 2011 Entrepreneur of the Year by the Fermanian School of Business (FSB) at Point Loma Nazarene University. Harmon was one of five finalists in the FSB’s Entrepreneur Enrichment Program (EEP).

Harmon’s project, EHipp, is developing medical records software for overlooked sectors of the health care industry.

“Thank you so much for providing a platform for me to work on this project,” said Harmon. “This experience has been incredibly challenging but at the same time amazing, and I have loved every second of it!” 

Following a nearly yearlong process that began with the annual EEP Exposition and “pitch” last September, five student entrepreneurial ventures received mentoring throughout the 2010-11 academic year while developing a detailed business plan. There were three experienced entrepreneurial mentors for each venture from a wide variety of business interests throughout the western U.S. The mentors also served as judges for the plans. The plans were completed and submitted by April 15, 2011. The judges then had two weeks to review the plans on a secure online site. 

“In the past year, I have dove fully into eHipp,” said Harmon. “I have read books and articles, interviewed physicians, nurses, and medical students, attended classes and conferences, job shadowed venture capitalists, and met with recognized leaders and thinkers of medical innovation. Through this process, I have felt like it was up to me to find a place where this software could work and succeed. You will see from the business plan that I believe I have done that.” 

Randy M. Ataide, the EEP advisor and PLNU professor of entrepreneurship said, “Each year presents a different variety of projects and entrepreneurial interests, and this year was no exception. What stands out in this year’s program was the dedication of most of the entrepreneurs to maximize the opportunity to be mentored.”  

The FSB announced Harmon’s award at a banquet attended by approximately 85 entrepreneurs, mentors, students, and supporters on Wednesday evening, April 27, 2011. 

Harmon earned a total of $3,000 in funding from the EEP Endowment towards supporting his entrepreneurial endeavors, and was mentored by Stephen Thesing, Robert Harp and Bart Grunau, all experienced EEP mentors.

Other honorees included brothers Derek Jackson, a senior double major at PLNU in business administration and music, joined by his brother Marcus Jackson, a PLNU business administration alumni from 2007, for their project Forte Gigs, a musician promotion and management company for student musicians, who earned an additional $1,500 from the EEP Endowment as well as winning the Dave and Dorothy Latter Free Enterprise Award. PLNU MBA John Cosby earned $1,500 from the endowment as well as nabbing the Social Entrepreneur Award of another $200 for his project, BorderTraffic.com.

The other completed projects were by Carl Gardner, a 2010 business administration graduate, who created Gardner BioFuels and Reid Sund, a 2010 accounting graduate, who developed Care Connection. All participating projects that completed the EEP received $500 each, and additional projects were announced for the 2011-12 EEP.

Craig Van Hulzen, CEO of Van Hulzen Asset Management in Jackson, Ca., and a co-founder of the EEP and the EEP Endowment, stated “ While not a year of large numbers in the EEP, the quality of the completed plans is the best by far in the history of the EEP. It reflects the evolving nature of the EEP and the rising expectations of quality among the participants.” 

Fermanian Business & Economic Institute, PLNU
27
Apr

Wednesday is the 2010-2011 Entrepreneur Enrichment Program Banquet. The Entrepreneur Enrichment Program (EEP) seeks to encourage, stimulate, and nourish the entrepreneurial process in any full or part-time student and in all academic disciplines at PLNU by providing specific personal, business, and professional counsel for student-entrepreneurs' business plans from recognized industry leaders, entrepreneurs, and financiers.  

This year's participants displayed their ideas at the expo on October 6 in the School of Business.  Following the expo they each gave a three-minute pitch to the business review team who judged their projects.  The finalists have been announced and have been paired with mentors to assist the students in developing a solid business plan for their specific project.  Winners will be announced at the EEP Banquet.

 

Entrepreneur Enrichment Program (EEP) Banquet
Wednesday, April 27, 2011 • 5:30 - 8 p.m.
Fermanian School of Business & Conference Center


Email Courtney Hamad to reserve your spot at CourtneyHamad@pointloma.edu   

PLNU
21
Apr

PLNU student and children with Down syndrome and their families celebrated Easter early on Tuesday.

DS Action, a San Diego Down syndrome advocacy group, along with PLNU's School of Education, Department of Family & Consumer Sciences, and Department of Kinesiology, helped put on the DS Action Easter Egg Hunt and Parents Reception on the Alumni House Lawn. Children and their families participated in games and activities, an Easter egg hunt, and a visit from the Easter bunny. Each child was paired with a PLNU student-volunteer, "special friends" who spent time playing with the children while families enjoyed the reception.

This event supported of the Pediatric Down Syndrome Center at Rady Children’s Hospital, a center that DS Action advocated for.

Education, Family & Consumer Sciences, Kinesiology, PLNU
19
Apr

Friday is Earth Day. PLNU observes the spirit of Earth Day all through the year, with the diverse activities during the annual Creation Care Week in the fall and Bike the Jam once a month. On Friday, PLNU will be joining in on the observance and festivities by holding a special edition Bike The Jam, where participants will get free coffee if they bring a reusable mug.

PLNU has been ramping up efforts to care for creation for years. Residence halls produce limited waste and are energy efficient. In 2010, Finch Hall was completely remodeled with sustainability in mind, adding recycled-content carpet, a filtered water filling station, a sink-to-toilet grey water recycling system, and natural lighting.

The Green Fund, a student-initiated fee of five dollars per semester, was set up to increase funds for energy, water, and resource conservation efforts on campus. It provides about $25,000 for projects each year. In 2010, the fund provided for a bike service station, more fruit trees on campus, and a community garden expansion.

The Octopus Garden, affectionately named by its founders at Students for Environmental Awareness (SEA), offers plots for green or brown-thumbed students, faculty, and staff to try their hands at tending a small crop. Sprouting this season are quinoa, corn, lettuce, grapes, and carrots, just to name a few.

PLNU students also have the opportunity to engage more deeply in the academic side of creation care by signing up for PLNU’s sustainability studies minor, which began in fall 2010. The interdisciplinary program brings together perspectives from business, biology, theology, sociology, and other areas.

Other creation care highlights from around campus include:

  • A tray-less cafeteria that ensures 30 percent of its food is from local sources
  • Composting of cafeteria waste
  • A growing solar panel system that will provide more than 40 percent of the university’s peak period electricity consumption when completed
  • Hydration stations around campus where reusable water bottles can be refilled for free
  • Water-saving shower switches that allow water flow to be reduced by 75 percent while maintaining water temperature
  • Waterless urinals and low-flow or dual-flush toilets that save approximately 40,000 gallons of water a year
Creation Care, PLNU, Sustainability
05
Apr

Rip, Shred, Tear.  To some, these three words may sound like a papier-mâché project.  For one PLNU junior, though, these three words have evolved into a project that has received global recognition.  Madison Dyer, a film studies major, spent his summer working on a 30-minute surf documentary, Rip Shred Tear,  in conjunction with San Diego’s Captain Fin Surf Company and Hurley.

A standard surf movie takes about a year to film.  Dyer and his crew took a different approach by completing all filming in a two-month period.

“I started shooting in May and we had it all wrapped up by August,” said Dyer. “The whole point of it was to showcase surfing and the long board alternative community in that summer.”

Dyer was in charge of shooting and editing the film.  Although he had some creative input, the concept alone came from Mitch Abshere, Captain Fin Surf Company owner.  With over 20 hours of footage, a lot of behind the scenes work had to be done to complete a successful project.

“It was a really good learning experience—especially for the other side of shooting,” said Dyer.  “The scheduling and contacting people was the part I haven’t dealt with, so it was a really good experience.”

The film has had its premieres across the globe, most notably three in Japan with distribution by Hurley.  With a country geared towards surfing and ‘60s culture, most surfing companies have a Japan branch. 

Although Dyer spent his summer in the realm of surfing, he has turned his interests toward the more sophisticated side of film in marketing.  As a PLNU marketing intern, Dyer has been responsible for making mini documentaries and commercials that focus on alumni profiles, departmental profiles, professors, business events and even television commercials.

“Ideally, the stuff I am interested is mostly short stuff, commercials, music videos,” said Dyer.  “I’ve made a few connections with people in  the commercial world, and hope I can try to get away from surfing and get to a strictly professional marketing base.”

As for personal side projects, Dyer has a couple in the works.  After a successful completion of last year’s short film, Rungs, which won best film at PLNU’s film festival, Dyer is embarking on another short adventure.  The film is being produced in one of the film production courses, and focuses on a guy who secretly cheats on his girlfriend and accidentally sends a text that might get him in trouble.  In an attempt to save himself, he tries to erase the text message while a close friend documents the whole process.  In addition to this, he will also be working with Captain Fin Surf Company on another surf project that will be pitched to Fuel TV.

It is evident that Dyer possesses the drive and talent to be successful.  Although he has already gained some notoriety for his work, he says that his ethic has started with class projects.  They have inspired him to produce quality work and continue to drive him to expand his mind creatively.    

“Having professors and peers that have pushed you to do stuff out of your comfort zone--as repetitive as a lot of school projects can get--really pushes you to work under a deadline and learn the whole process,” said Dyer.  “Really, I have both of those to be thankful for.”

Written by Nicholle Jaramillo

PLNU
01
Apr

Need a little inspiration, enlightenment, or encouragement? Check out a few recent stories featuring PLNU staff and faculty:

Patricia Leslie, director of PLNU's social work program and member of San Diego's Regional Task Force on the Homeless board of directors, gives insight into the epidemic of addiction. (San Diego City Beat)

Eric Readinger is a familiar face in the Caf. He is also a part of Partnerships with Industry. Read about his day-to-day. (San Diego Union Tribune)

Lynn Reaser, PLNU's chief economist, joins a conversation about the national debt's effect on you. Learn more. (U.S. News & World Report)


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