PLNU News

19
Feb

(San Diego, Calif. – February 19, 2014) – Thursday, February 20th PLNU will kick off the 19th Annual Writer’s Symposium by the Sea on the Point Loma campus with featured guest, Samuel Freedman. 

 

An award-winning author, professor and New York Times columnist, Freedman is a master storyteller, known for his insightful, well-researched writing that creates powerful narratives of people engaged with the issues of race, faith, and other issues of social justice faced by modern American culture. Books include Breaking the Line, Jew vs. Jew, Small Victories, Letters to a Young Journalist, and more.

 

Thursday’s event begins at 7p.m. with a conversation between Freedman and PLNU Journalism Professor, Dean Nelson in Salomon Theatre on PLNU’s main campus. Freedman is also presenting an afternoon workshop on Thursday at 1:30, “Trust Me, I’m A Writer”. Full details and registration information can be found here. The Writer’s Symposium continues with full force into the following week and runs through February 27th. The 19th annual event features a number of workshops and key note conversations with Siddhartha Mukherjee, Jeannette Walls and Anne Lamott. 

 

Writer’s Symposium by the Sea is an annual event that brings interviews with cutting edge creators, life stories, examples of great writing, and evocative conversation that will inspire the reader and writer alike. The evening interviews, conducted by symposium founder Dean Nelson, feature lively conversations about the stories behind the author’s stories. The audience gets to eavesdrop on these exchanges and even interact with the writer during a Q&A session that follows. Specialized afternoon workshops, conducted by published writers, provide tips and insight into the writing process. You are invited to join us and listen in on what some of today’s cutting edge writers have to say! Past guests have included Ray Bradbury, Anne Lamott, Philip Yancey, Dave Eggers, Amy Tan, Bill McKibben, Donald Miller, George Plimpton, and many more.

PLNU
17
Jan

With the opening of his innovative and progressive exhibit, “Hither and Yon” on January 11th, PLNU’s David Adey has certainly been busy. The solo exhibit, which opened at Scott White Contemporary Art in La Jolla, California, was accompanied by the premier of a full-length documentary on Adey that same evening. 

Dale Schierholt’s film, “Art by Constraint”, premiered before a full crowd at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in La Jolla. The full documentary will air on local television tonight at 9pm on San Diego’s KPBS, channel 15. A preview can be viewed here: https://vimeo.com/76911164.  

Additionally, throughout the day, KPBS will feature interviews with Adey on the radio at 89.5fm during the KPBS “Morning Edition” and afternoon “All Things Considered” programs and during the 5pm and 6:30pm broadcasts of Evening Edition on KPBS TV.

Since January of 2013, Adey has committed his full attention to creating the immense body of work contained in “Hither and Yon” during a yearlong hiatus from the classroom. This sabbatical allowed him to serve as the first ever artist-in-residence at Scott White Contemporary Art. Throughout this process, Schierholt documented Adey through film and interview. Schierholt successfully captured the essence of the exhibit and Adey’s methodical process within the bounds of a self-realized constraint.

In “Hither and Yon”, Adey utilizes a diverse range of materials and techniques to investigate the concept of constraints as a metaphor for the human condition. Adey admits that it's often the constraints and boundaries he sets for himself during the conceptualizing phase that inform his work. “Constraint gives you something to push up against. A tool to make creative decisions” says Adey. With this approach Adey is able to find not only artistic freedom, but also a common thread that unites these seemingly tangential mediums. 

A 1994 graduate of PLNU, Adey received his Masters of Fine Arts at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan in 2002, before returning to his alma mater as a member of the faculty in 2003. “Hither and Yon” runs at Scott White Contemporary Art through February 15, 2014. 

Art & Design, External Relations, Office of Community & Government Relations, PLNU
09
Jan

For the past year, Point Loma Nazarene University Professor of Art, David Adey has been on sabbatical, hard at work on his innovative and progressive exhibit, “Hither and Yon”. The culmination of this work occurs Saturday, January 11th with Adey’s opening reception of his premier solo exhibit at Scott White Contemporary Art in La Jolla, California.

 

In “Hither and Yon”, the result of his yearlong hiatus from the classroom, Adey utilizes a diverse range of materials and techniques to investigate the concept of constraints as a metaphor for the human condition. Each piece within this exhibition has undergone a methodical process for its creation within the bounds of a self-realized constraint. Adey admits that it's often the constraints and boundaries he sets for himself during the conceptualizing phase that inform his work. “Constraint gives you something to push up against. A tool to make creative decisions” says Adey. With this approach Adey is able to find not only artistic freedom, but also a common thread that unites these seemingly tangential mediums. 

 

Some of Adey’s most iconic works in this series involve carefully deconstructed consumer images pulled from various Google searches. Using fragments of skin from hundreds of models and celebrities, he creates elaborate pinned collages reminiscent of complex entomological displays. The piece, Gravitational Radius, uses exclusively fashion and celebrity images. Adey exploits their two-dimensional nature by extruding them into three-dimensional space. Each decontextualized body fragment is transformed into a thin membrane of flesh, as its source and identity are lost. The final product is a homogenized mosaic of push-pinned skin that is macabre by nature, but somehow strikingly beautiful

 

In Hide, an inventive take on a self-portrait, Adey explores a different method of deconstructing and flattening the human form. Beginning with a three-dimensional scan of his entire body, he creates a triangulated three-dimensional model of himself comprised of over 75,000 triangles. From there, the model is unfolded and flattened to form a two-dimensional record of the entire surface of the artist’s body, all in one piece, without overlaps. This two-dimensional apparition is then laser cut and framed in two adjacent panels to create a diptych resembling a cross between a Dymaxion Map and a Rorschach test.

 

Other works in “Hither and Yon” encompass a wide range of materials and concepts such as cold war-era electronics, plastic and paper cups and buckets, and a collaborative piece with an Actuary, yet his voice and vision remain clear and consistent throughout the exhibition. Adey has managed to successfully fuse contemporary art concept with formal creation and aesthetic. His work reflects a practiced and methodical process that results in works that are not only visually elaborate, but also intellectually stimulating and conceptually provocative.

 

Since January of 2013 Adey has committed his full attention to creating this body of work as Scott White Contemporary Art’s first ever artist-in-residence. Scott White Contemporary Art has been supporting Adey throughout the year, allowing him the space, time and freedom to pursue new and exciting directions with his work. Filmmaker Dale Schierholt has also been documenting David through film and interview. The completed project will be a full-length documentary on David Adey with a premier screening at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in La Jolla on Saturday night and broadcast on KPBS on January 17th.  A preview of Dale Schierholt’s documentary can be viewed here.

 

Prior to this exhibit, Adey’s work was featured at the 2010 California Biennial hosted by the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach, CA, and was also included in Here Not There: San Diego Art Now (2010) at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. His solo exhibition at Luis de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles was selected by The Huffington Post as one of ‘Southern California’s Top 10 Exhibitions for 2010’, and a recent exhibition at the La Jolla Athenaeum was named ‘Exhibition of the Year’ by the San Diego Fine Art Society. In addition, David Adey has also exhibited in Miami, Detroit, Boston, Finland and Berlin. 

 

A 1994 graduate of PLNU, Adey received his Masters of Fine Arts at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan in 2002. He returned to his alma mater as a member of the faculty in 2003. “Hither and Yon” runs at Scott White Contemporary Art through February 15, 2014. 

External Relations, Office of Community & Government Relations, PLNU
29
Aug

August 30 and 31, PLNU will host New Student Orientation (NSO) on the Point Loma campus. 

NSO is a two-day experience over Labor Day Weekend designed to help students and parents/guests become acclimated to university life. Recognized as one of the premier orientation events for new students, PLNU has spent the past fifteen years refining and enhancing their campus welcome for students and parents alike.  

“The purpose of NSO is really about student success,” says PLNU President, Dr. Bob Brower. “We've found that when new students and their family experience an informative, helpful, and engaging welcome by hundreds of students and staff, the transition into the university creates a strong start for students and erases many unknowns in their adjustment to college.”

To avoid congestion on Friday and make the process as smooth as possible, each new student is assigned a time to check in. Check-in is in Nicholson Commons at assigned times. Following check-in, residential students will move their belongings into their residential hall rooms. Greeted by large teams of student leaders, vehicles are unloaded swiftly and painlessly, to allow students and families maximum time to participate in the weekend’s events.  

In addition to the many social activities during NSO, students have the opportunity to meet several times with faculty and students in their academic major area. All students are encouraged to select a major in an area of study they plan to pursue or in which they have an interest even if their choice is tentative.  

The welcome is not limited to freshman students. Transfer students attend many of the same sessions as first-time freshman in addition to the Transfer Student Track on Saturday. According to Caye Barton Smith, Psy.D., Vice President for Student Development, “These sessions were created specifically for transfer students, to encourage and welcome these ‘students with experience’ into the PLNU community.” 

Classes begin at PLNU on Wednesday, September 4th. The Fall 2013 semester marks the largest group of incoming students to campus. With nearly 800 new students, and an average GPA of 3.77 for the incoming class, NSO will usher in an exciting semester at PLNU.

Admissions (Undergraduate), NSO, PLNU
29
Jul

July 30 through August 3, PLNU will host Make-A-Wish recipient, Sarah Fallon at the Training Minds Speech & Debate Camp on the Point Loma campus. Michael Hyatt, bestselling author of “Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World,” will be the keynote speaker at the event on Wednesday, July 31.

Nationally recognized for having one of the top speech and debate programs in the country, PLNU regularly competes successfully against university teams from across the nation, including the University of California, Berkeley, Rice University, the University of Colorado, and others.

To build the program’s continued success, PLNU coach Dr. Skip Rutledge, professor of forensics and communications, sees value in exposing young high school debaters to university caliber forensics through hosted debates and events.

“Hosting a camp allows us to help train, equip and empower this community, and possibly to recruit some of them to join our campus community and speech and debate team, as they are looking for colleges or universities to attend,” said Rutledge.

Sarah, a 17-year-old from Missouri, has made her Make-A-Wish wish to attend the Training Minds Speech & Debate Camp at PLNU. A homeschool student who got her first taste of speech and debate last year, Sarah put the camp on the top of her wish list after learning the details from her coach. Her entire family will travel to San Diego for the upcoming camp.

Make-a-Wish Foundation raises funds to grant wishes to children suffering from fatal and high-risk sicknesses. Sarah is in the midst of a long battle with Acute Lymphatic Luekemia (ALL), a fast-growing cancer of the white blood cells. Sarah is receiving chemotherapy every week and is on four medications.

“The medical summaries state her health is ‘good,’ which means she's fully functioning but may get tired at times,” said Training Minds Ministry president Chris Jeub.

“Of the five speech tracks available to students, Sarah chose 'platform,'” said Jeub. “This means she will be trained to write a platform speech (e.g. an oratory, expository, or persuasive speech). Platform speeches written by young people tend to be about other people or things in life as they often don’t yet have a powerful platform from which to build. But Sarah has a platform. She's struggling with a brutal sickness. Training Minds will be out to turn that platform into action and win some tournaments.”

Communications & Theatre, Forensics, info-center, PLNU
15
Jul

Irwin Herman has been known as “the Bookman” in San Diego for the past 23 years. During the past two-plus decades, he and his nonprofit organization, The Bookman, have given away more than 8 million books. His quiet but expansive work has garnered media attention in the past, and now his journey has been chronicled in a new book, The Bookman, by Art Seamans, professor emeritus at Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU). 

Seamans’ book will be presented to Herman at a literary tea held on the PLNU campus on Thursday, July 18 at 2 p.m. at the Bond Academic Center patio. Media and interested community members are invited to attend and to celebrate the great philanthropic efforts of this local hero. Both Herman and Seamans will be available for interview and comment. 

Herman freely gives out new and used books to charitable organizations, teachers, active duty military, students, homeless shelters, prisons, and other individuals and organizations in need of reading materials. San Diego City College alone receives approximately 5,000 books a week. Donations have been made in all 50 states and many foreign countries. The Bookman operates his charity out of a 5,000 square foot warehouse at El Cajon Boulevard and 37th Street in City Heights, the space and electricity having been donated by San Diegan Jack Grace. The Bookman is an entirely volunteer-run, 501(c)3 organization.

Seamans is a retired professor and author of six books. Despite having lost his vision, he continues to read and write prolifically.

info-center, Literature, Journalism & Modern Languages, PLNU