Mission Valley Disability Resource Center

Types of Accomodations

The scope of accommodations provided by PLNU are based on official medical documentation, availability of resources, personnel, and discretion of the Director of the DRC. In compliance with university policy, students with disabilities may be eligible for one or more of the following accommodations. 

Academic Accommodations

In general, an accommodation is a change in the learning environment to provide equal opportunity for academic or physical accessibility. The nature of the accommodation is considered individually, using recommendations in the documentation of the disability. Accommodations are to be reasonable, not impose an undue hardship on the operation of the program, and not fundamentally alter the academic and technical standards. Also, accommodations such as note-takers are not in lieu of classroom attendance and participation.

Possible academic accommodations at PLNU may include, but are not limited to:

  • Electronic Textbooks
  • Exams: Alternative Environment
  • Exams: Time Extensions
  • Note-taking Services
  • Reader Services
  • Recording Lectures
  • Reduced Course Load
  • Assistive Technology
  • Scribe

Non-Academic Accommodations

Non-academic accommodations are related to activities and services not found in the classroom, yet support an equitable campus environment. The nature of the accommodation is to provide a qualified individual with an equal opportunity and access.

Possible non-academic accommodations at PLNU may include, but are not limited to:

  • Parking (Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors only)
  • Housing
  • Dining

Dietary Accommodations

The Live Well program at PLNU provides students with dietary disabilities, free nutritional consultation in the Wellness Center. In conjunction with the partnership between Sodexo Dining Services and the DRC, this program is administered by PLNU's registered dietitian.

Do you have food allergies, sensitivities, or intolerances? You can work alongside the registered dietitian to have your needs met in the dining hall.

To get started:

  • Schedule an appointment with the registered dietitian in the Wellness Center.
  • Submit official medical documentation related to your dietary needs to the DRC from your current licensed professional.

You are encouraged to learn more about managing your food allergies, sensitivities, and intolerances by visiting the Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) website.

Our campus dining facilities are equipped and dedicated to providing safe, healthy, and delicious options for students who have food allergies, Celiac disease, and other dietary needs. Dining managers and chefs are certified through the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness Great Kitchens© program to accommodate a gluten-free diet.

Housing Placement Considerations

All requests for disability housing accommodations must be medically documented and submitted to the DRC for review by February 15 for fall semester housing placement and by November 15 for the spring semester. Newly admitted students must make housing accommodation requests prior to May 31st. All housing accommodations requests, whether current students or incoming, are considered on a case by case basis and are always ranked based on student medical needs, availability and not preference.

Accessing Accommodations at PLNU

ACCESSING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS AT PLNU


Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) provides individuals with disabilities access to the programs, services, and activities of the University.  Pursuant to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as amended by the ADA Amendments Act, and other applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations, PLNU prohibits discrimination and harassment against a qualified individual with a disability.  As stated in Section 504: “No otherwise qualified individual shall, solely by his or her disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”

The PLNU Disability Resource Center (DRC) is the point of contact regarding disability issues for all PLNU undergraduate and graduate students including students enrolled at the Mission Valley campus and College of Extended Learning students enrolled in courses at Community College satellites.  The DRC assists current and prospective students, by maximizing access and opportunity for participation in all activities at PLNU.

Reasonable Accommodation Procedures for Current and Prospective Students


The DRC is the point of contact for providing reasonable accommodations to qualified individuals with disabilities to enable them to participate in University life. Current and prospective PLNU students are expected to meet the minimum academic and technical standards of all University programs.The DRC assesses the academic and non-academic disability-related needs of qualified individuals with disabilities to build and facilitate reasonable accommodation plans.  Students requesting accommodations must first self-disclose their disability to the Disability Resource Center.

Students who request accommodations from faculty or staff outside of the DRC must be referred to the DRC to begin the process for registering for accommodations.  In order for current students and prospective students to receive reasonable accommodations at PLNU, these procedures must be followed:

  •  Students and prospective students seeking an accommodation must first register as a person with a disability by making a written request for an accommodation with the DRC, provide appropriate documentation to the DRC, actively participate in the accommodation registration process, and contact the DRC if a granted accommodation is not meeting the student’s needs. Once sufficient and official documentation is received, the DRC will contact the student within 15 business days to schedule a face-to-face meeting to discuss the accommodation request/develop an Official Accommodation Plan.
  • Students and prospective students must submit to the DRC official documentation that is no more than three years old from a clinically diagnosing medical/licensed professional verifying the nature and extent of the disability as it relates to the higher education environment.
  • Alternatively, the student may submit a DRC Provider Documentation Form completed by his or her current licensed healthcare professional.
  • Documentation from persons not licensed to diagnose such conditions will not be accepted.  At any time during the accommodation request process, the DRC reserves the right to request additional medical documentation of the nature of the disability and of the need for an accommodation.
  • Any PLNU transfer student who received services from a California Community College, California State, or University of California campus as a student with a disability may qualify for services from the DRC.  The DRC reviews the documentation from the prior institution and determines whether additional documentation from a medical professional is necessary.  The documentation from the prior institution must not be more than three years old.
  • After documentation of a disability has been provided and during a face-to-face meeting with the student, the DRC will determine whether the student is eligible for services and, if so, identify reasonable accommodations.  What constitutes a reasonable accommodation will vary depending on the circumstances of each case.  In evaluating alternatives for accommodation, the DRC will work in conjunction with the student to develop an accommodation plan, but the ultimate decision regarding what type of accommodation, if any, will be provided is made by the DRC.
  • Accommodations may include non-academic adjustments, such as housing and dining and/or academic adjustments, such as extended exam times and alternate exam environments, as well as auxiliary aids/services such as note-taking services, scribes, large print handouts, electronic textbooks, alternatives to printed tests, and other assistive technology. 
  • PLNU is not required, however, to provide attendants, individually prescribed devices, readers for personal use or study, or other devices or services of a personal nature.
  • When an accommodation is granted, the DRC will provide a printed Accommodation Plan of all of the accommodations to the student via their official PLNU email.
  • Students are expected to meet the minimum academic and technical standards of University programs. 
  • Students are expected to follow all instructions contained in their accommodation plan, actively participate in the accommodation process and contact the DRC if a granted accommodation is not meeting their disability-related needs.
  • Students are expected to follow all instructions contained in their accommodation plan regarding scheduling for extended exam times, alternate exam sites, and other academic adjustments.
  • The DRC will provide the accommodation plan to the relevant instructors and/or other administrative offices (if applicable) within a reasonable timeframe.
  • The University community (e.g., Instructors and other administrative offices) is responsible for facilitating accommodations or adjustments as outlined in DRC’s Accommodation Plan.

Accommodation Appeals

Accommodations/Academic Adjustment Grievance and Appeal Process

Point Loma Nazarene University prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. PLNU has adopted an internal grievance procedure providing for prompt and equitable resolution of complaints by any member of the PLNU community alleging any action prohibited by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (§29 U.S.C. 794) of the U.S. Department of Education regulations implementing the Act, and the Americans With Disabilities Act, 1990 Title II & III (§42 U.S.C. 126). Section 504 and the ADA, Sections Title II & Title III prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. The Law and Regulations may be examined in the office of the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator who has been designated to coordinate the efforts of PLNU to comply with Section 504 and the ADA.

Kimberly Joy Bogan, PsyD
Associate Dean Student Success and Wellness
ADA/504 Coordinator
(619) 849-2255
kimbogan@pointloma.edu

Any participant who believes she or he has been subjected to discrimination on the basis of disability (or is unsatisfied with accommodation/academic adjustment plans) provided by the Disability Resource Center may file a grievance under this procedure. It is against the law for PLNU to retaliate against anyone who files a grievance or cooperates in the investigation of a grievance. The ADA/Section 504 Coordinator should be notified immediately if anyone associated with the grievance procedure is subjected to retaliation as a result of that person's participation in the grievance process.

PLNU has both informal and formal mechanisms in place to resolve concerns about disability discrimination, denial of access to services, accommodations and/or academic adjustment plans required by law, or an auxiliary aid they believe they should have received ("disability-related issues"), such as:

  • Disagreements regarding a requested service, accommodation, academic adjustment plan, modification of University practice or requirement, or denial of a request
  • Inaccessibility of a program or activity
  • Violation of privacy in the context of a disability

Informal Grievance Process

PLNU encourages anyone with concerns about a disability-related issue to first discuss the matter with the Disability Resource Center, who will attempt to facilitate a resolution. Individuals are not required to pursue the informal process first and may engage the formal grievance process as their first step if preferred. The Disability Resource Center can be reached at drc@pointloma.edu.

If the Disability Resource Center is not successful in achieving a satisfactory resolution, within ten working days from the date the disability-related issue is raised, or the complaint is against the Office itself, a formal grievance may be filed as described below.

The purpose of the informal process is to make a good faith effort to resolve the issue quickly and efficiently; however, the individual may ask to implement the formal process at any time during the informal resolution or instead of the formal resolution.

Formal Grievance Process

A formal grievance must be filed with the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator within 21 working days of the date of the Informal decision, if applicable, or within 30 calendar days of the occurrence of the disability-related issue. The grievance must be in writing and include the following:

  • The grievant's name, address, email address and phone number
  • A full description of the situation
  • A description of the efforts which have been made to resolve the issue informally, if any
  • A statement of the requested remedy, e.g. requested accommodation/academic adjustment plan

If the grievance involves confidential medical information, the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator will maintain the confidentiality of that information and will not release that information without the individual's permission, except as allowed by law.

The ADA/ Section 504 Coordinator will review the grievance for timeliness and appropriateness under this grievance procedure and notify the grievant if the grievance has been accepted.

The ADA/Section 504 Coordinator either commences an investigation or will select a trained investigator who will promptly initiate an investigation. The investigator will be an individual who is trained on disability or civil rights issues. In undertaking the investigation, the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator or investigator may interview, consult with and/or request a written response to the issues raised in the grievance from any individual the investigator believes to have relevant information, including but not limited to faculty, staff, students, and visitors to PLNU. All parties will have an opportunity to provide the investigator with information or evidence that the party believes is relevant to his or her grievance. All parties involved will receive a fair and equitable process and be treated with care and respect. The investigator will respect the privacy of all parties.

The investigation will be completed within thirty calendar days of the filing of the written complaint. At the request of the grievant, the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator will determine whether the formal grievance process can and should be expedited.

Findings and Notification

Within five working days of the completion of the investigation, the investigator will make a recommendation regarding appropriate actions to be taken. The investigator will summarize the evidence that supports the recommendation, and the grievant will be advised in writing of the outcome of the investigation.

Appeal Process

Within five calendar days of receiving the determination from the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator, the grievant or the party against whom the grievance is directed, if any, may appeal the determination. To appeal, the party must file a written request for review with the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator. The written request for appeal must be based on the grounds of improper procedure, or new evidence that was unavailable at the time of the investigation. The Coordinator will convene an Appeal Board to conduct a formal review of the appeal.

The ADA/Section 504 Coordinator will provide the person appealing with a copy of the appeal written decision within five calendar days of the filing of the appeal. The appeal decision will be the final determination of the PLNU. The individual also may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, at any time before, during or after the University's ADA/Section 504 grievance process.

Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals at PLNU

Point Loma Nazarene University complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in allowing use of service animals for students. PLNU complies with the Fair Housing Act in allowing students the use of emotional support animals that are approved as an accommodation. The Human Resources (HR) Office is the point of contact for staff, faculty and visitor procedures for service and emotional support animals on campus.

The following information describes the procedures for the use of service animals and emotional support animals by students registered for classes at the Point Loma Nazarene University main campus and Mission Valley campus. Students enrolled in PLNU College of Extended Learning courses located on Community College satellites and the Bakersfield campus should contact the DRC for assistance and registration before bringing animals on campus.

Definitions

Service Animal - A service animal as per the ADA is defined as: “Any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the owner's disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing non-violent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, . . . retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. The crime deterrent effects of an animal's presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this definition.”                         

Emotional Support Animal (ESA) - The Fair Housing Act defines an emotional support animal as any animal that provides emotional support, well-being, or companionship that alleviates or mitigates symptoms of the disability; the animal is not individually trained. Emotional support animals are not limited to dogs and can be other species of animal. Emotional support animals are not considered service animals.

In order to bring an emotional support animal to campus, the Owner/Handler must contact DRC no less than 90 days prior to arrival, in order to permit time to gather all necessary documentation.  Animals should not be brought to campus prior to approval being granted.  The University will make an individualized assessment of each proposed emotional support animal. Dogs must also be completely trained and housebroken.

Owner/Handler - A person with a service animal or emotional support animal.  

Qualifying to have a service or emotional support animal on campus

To qualify for having a service animal on campus:

  • The student must have a disability as defined by the ADA.
  • The accompanying animal must be trained to do specific tasks for the qualified individual; and
  • Students must register with the Disability Resource Center (DRC) office if the service animal will be housed on the campus so that accommodations can be coordinated.
  • The DRC will contact Residential Life as early as possible to permit time to gather and review all necessary documentation.
  • Service animal requests must be renewed each academic year.
  • Students living off campus who require the use of a service animal on campus are required to contact DRC to register as a student with a disability. Information provided to DRC is confidential and specific information about the disability will not be released without the consent of the student.

For a student to qualify to have an emotional support animal (ESA) in his or her residence hall:

  • The student must have a disability as defined by the ADA.
  • The student must be approved and registered with the DRC office.
  • The student must have an already established relationship with the animal.
  • The emotional support animal must be approved through the DRC office as an official accommodation, in conjunction with other offices as needed.
  • The owner must notify the DRC if the animal is no longer needed or is no longer residing on University property.  If the animal will be replaced, the owner must submit a new request.
  • ESA animal requests must be renewed each academic year.

Service animals on campus

Responsibilities and Requirements

Service Animal Owner/Handler:

  • Is responsible to attend to and be in full control of the service animal at all times. A service animal shall have a harness, leash, or other tether unless a) the owner is unable to use a harness, leash or tether, or b) using a harness, leash, or tether will interfere with the animal’s ability to safely and effectively perform its duties.
  • Is responsible for ensuring that the service animal is wearing a leash, harness or cape that identifies the animal as a service animal when on duty anywhere on campus.
  • Is responsible for the costs of care necessary for a service animal’s well-being. The arrangements and responsibilities with the care of a service animal is the sole responsibility of the owner at all times, including regular bathing and grooming, as needed.
  • Is responsible for independently removing or arranging for the removal of the service animal’s waste.  Waste must be disposed in a sealed bag in the designated trash area of the residence hall.
  • Is responsible for complying with local and state licensing laws for animal rights and owner responsibilities. Service animals should be current with immunizations and wear a rabies vaccination tag. The owner is responsible for paying for any damage to University property caused by the animal.
  • Animals must leave campus with the student anytime the student leaves overnight and/or during University breaks.
  • The University may prohibit the use of service animals in certain locations due to health and safety restrictions or places where the animal might be in danger.  Restricted areas may include but are not limited to food preparation areas, research laboratories, boiler rooms, and other areas prohibited by law.

University Community:

  • Must allow service animals to accompany their owners at all times and everywhere on campus where the general public (if accompanying a visitor) or other students (if accompanying a student) are allowed, except for places where there is a health, environmental, or safety hazard.
  • The appropriate way to ascertain that an animal is a service animal is to ask (only if it is not apparent) if the animal is required because of a disability and what tasks it has been trained to perform. Specific questions about the individual’s disability may not be asked. Contact DRC if any questions or concerns arise relating to service animals.
  • Only two questions can be asked about service animals:
    • Is the Service Animal required because of a disability?
    • What work or task is the dog trained to perform?
  • Do not ask questions about the disability.
  • Do not pet or feed a service animal.
  • Do not attempt to separate the animal from the owner.
  • Do not startle or tease a service animal.
  • Contact HR if faculty/staff have any questions regarding employee/visitors on campus who have service animals.
  • Refrain from charging a fee for the service animal to reside in the residence hall, but may assess usual fees for any damages incurred.
  • Report any service animals who misbehave or any owners (or other individuals) who mistreat their service animals to the Department of Public Safety (DPS).

DRC:

  • Is responsible for developing the necessary procedures for the University, coordinating with appropriate administrative offices, and facilitating the use of service animals by students on campus.
  • Assists owners and the University community when questions or concerns arise relating to service animals on campus and seeks legal advice when necessary.

Emotional support animals in university-owned residences

 Responsibilities and Requirements 

 ESA Owner/Handler:

  • Is responsible to attend and be in full control of the emotional support animal at all times. The emotional support animal shall have a harness, leash, tether or be transported in an appropriate enclosure whenever it is outside of the residence hall room where it will be housed.
  • In shared living spaces, the emotional support animal should be in an appropriate container if the owner is not in the room with the animal.
  • Is responsible for following all rules related to the restrictions of animals from buildings on the campus other than their residence hall.
  • Is responsible for the costs of care necessary for the emotional support animal’s well-being. The arrangements and responsibilities for the care of an emotional support animal are the sole responsibility of the owner at all times, including regular bathing and grooming, as needed.
  • Is responsible for not leaving the emotional support animal unattended for an unreasonable length of time.
  • Is responsible for independently removing or arranging for the removal of the emotional support animal’s waste. Waste must be disposed in a sealed bag in the designated trash area of the residence hall.
  • If the ESA voids on the floor or carpet anywhere inside a residence hall, the student is responsible to clean up promptly to the best of their own ability, as well as submit a work request with Facilities Management for the area to be properly disinfected. The student must pay all costs associated with such clean up. Dogs must be housebroken and accidents should be infrequent.
  • Is responsible for complying with local and state licensing laws for animal rights and owner responsibilities. Emotional support animals should be current with immunizations and wear a rabies vaccination tag if appropriate; this information must be kept on file in the DRC.
  • Animals must leave campus with the student if student leaves overnight and during all University breaks if the student leaves campus.
  • Is responsible for paying for any damage to University property or pest treatment caused by the animal.
  • Must abide by all applicable residential policies, including room inspections.
  • Is responsible for notifying DRC and Residential Life if the emotional support animal is no longer needed.
  • Is responsible for renewing ESA requests every academic year.

 University Community:

  • Must allow emotional support animals to reside with their owners in their residence hall room or suite once they are approved as a disability related accommodation.
  • Contact DRC if any questions or concerns arise relating to emotional support animals including any additional questions regarding visitors to campus who have emotional support animals.
  • Report any emotional support animals who misbehave or any owners (or other individuals) who mistreat their emotional support animals to the Department of Public Safety (DPS).
  • Refrain from charging a fee for the emotional support animal to reside in the residence hall, but may assess usual fees for any damages incurred.

 DRC:

  • Is responsible for developing the necessary procedures for the University and facilitating the use of emotional support animals by students on campus.
  • Will contact potential roommates and suitemates to determine if other students have any concerns about potentially living with an animal.
  • Assists owners and the university community when questions or concerns arise relating to emotional support animals on campus and seeks legal advice when necessary.
  • If other residents raise concerns about the animal and attempts at mediation are unsuccessful, the owner of the ESA will be provided with an alternate living space on campus and expected to move within a reasonable period of time.

Important considerations

A service or emotional support animal can be asked to leave or not allowed participation on campus if…

  • The animal is found by the University to be out of control or disruptive and the animal’s owner does not take immediate and effective action to control it.
  • The animal is not housebroken or kept in a cage where waste can be managed effectively.
  • The animal is found to be neglected or mistreated and prompt corrective action is not taken.
  • The animal is physically ill.
  • The animal is unreasonably dirty.
  • A service animal attempts to enter a place on campus where the presence of a service animal causes danger to the safety of the owner or other students/member of campus.
  • A service animal attempts to enter any place on campus where a service animal’s safety is compromised.
  • An emotional support animal is brought inside a building other than the approved residence hall.
  • ESA Requests must be renewed every academic year. If the animal is returned to campus without proper renewal, the animal may be removed from campus until approval is complete.

Roommate Considerations

Upon approval of an ESA, or if a student intends to have a service animal in residential housing, the student’s roommate(s) will be notified (if applicable) that the approved animal will be residing in shared assigned living space and to solicit their acknowledgement of such.

  •  All roommates must sign an agreement allowing the approved animal to be in residence with them. In the event that one or more roommates have concerns, the Office of Residential Life will consult with all of the individuals involved and, based on the circumstances, determine the appropriate course of action.  
  • If at a point later in time there is a conflict between roommates regarding the animal that cannot be resolved amongst the individuals involved, the Office of Residential Life should be contacted.  Appropriate parties will be consulted in order to reach a solution.

Significant allergies to animal dander and other concerns

 Concerns of this nature will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. DRC will work in conjunction with The Office of Residential Life to alert potential roommates of the fact that a service or emotional support animal will be present in an effort to address concerns including those related to allergies and objections or fears related to certain types of animals, as early as possible in the housing assignment process.

  • Community and/or residential issues or concerns that may arise during the academic year should be reported in writing as quickly as possible to the DRC via the DRC’s Official email (drc@pointloma.edu). Owners who have concerns about any matter affecting their use of a service or emotional support animal should also contact DRC.

Process for addressing disruptions to the campus community

Service animal or ESA disruptions in the residential hall should be reported to the Residential Director (RD); campus disruptions should be reported to the Department of Public Safety (DPS).

  • A student will receive a written warning from the RD and/or DPS if a complaint(s) is received regarding the animal.   Following the first warning, the student will have the opportunity to rectify the situation and correct the behavior. 
  • If a second complaint is received, the DRC will conduct a further assessment of the situation and the extent of impact to the community. 
  • Following a third complaint or incident, the animal will need to be removed from campus.  Students must identify a person who could come to campus to remove the animal if needed within a reasonable amount of time. This person must be identified during the approval process.
  • The individualized assessment of each incident may lead to escalation of this process, up to and including removal of an animal from campus after a first complaint, depending on the severity of any incident involving any service or support animal.

Important Reminder: Emotional support animals are not allowed anywhere on campus, outside of the residence hall, where animals are not normally allowed. 

  • An ESA may be removed from campus if it is found in any other building on campus, other than the student’s residence hall.
  • All animal owners must abide by applicable local ordinances. California State law requires that all dogs over the age of three months be vaccinated against rabies, and be licensed through the local city and town. Visit this link for more information: https://www.sddac.com/content/sdc/das/license-laws/license.html
  • Any service or emotional support animal who misbehaves or any owner (or others) who mistreat service or emotional support animals, should be reported to DPS.

Restricted areas

The University may prohibit the use of a Service Animals in certain locations due to health or safety restrictions.

  • Restricted areas may include but are not limited to food preparation areas, research laboratories or classrooms that contain research animals, areas that require protective clothing, and other areas as required by state or local laws.
  • Exceptions to these restrictions may be requested and will be considered on a case by case basis.
  • Approved Emotional Support Animals are permitted only in the residence halls.

Service animal and service animal owner etiquette

  • DO NOT pet, touch or otherwise distract a service animal when it is working. Doing so may Interfere with its ability to perform its duties.
  • DO NOT feed a service animal. Their work depends on a regular and consistent feeding regimen that the owner is responsible to maintain.
  • DO NOT attempt to separate the owner from the service animal.
  • DO NOT harass or deliberately startle a service animal.
  • Avoid initiating conversations about the student’s disability. Some people do not wish to discuss their disability.

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE RELATED TO SERVICE ANIMALS AND EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMALS

If the decision is made to deny a request for, or remove an animal covered by this policy, the affected individual may file a formal written grievance with the ADA/504 Coordinator pursuant to the DRC grievance procedures.

Educational Testing Referral List

Christine Wyeth, M.A. Licensed Educational Psychologist
Kids in Harmony
(619) 981-4581

Gupta Psychology & Assessment Services
3990 Old Town Ave., Suite A-208
San Diego, CA 92110
(619) 870-1462

San Diego BrainWorks Psychology & Neuropsychology Services
5850 Oberlin Dr., Suite 240
San Diego, CA 92121
(858) 914-1347

Coastal Psychiatric
2180 Garnet Ave., Suite 2E
San Diego, CA 92109
(858) 259-0599

Dr. Deisy Boscan
30330 5th Ave., Suite 235
San Diego, CA 92103
(619) 297-1750

Additional Private Pay Providers

Lotus Learning

Banyan Tree Learning Center

Dr. Rienzi Haytasingh, Licensed Educational Psychologist of Brain Learning  

Therapy Changes